About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNNW 4
KQED (PBS) 2
CNN 1
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
of 29th avenue and international boulevard. the grassroots operation is calling on city officials to make public safety a priority. >> preparations are underway for the 124th annual rose parade. volunteers are getting the impressive floats parade ready. this year's theme is "oh, the places you'll go." the parade features the valley christian high school band from san jose. you can watch the parade new year's morning at 8:00 right here on abc-7 news. leigh glaser is off today but lisa argen. it's been really cold. >> lisa: temperatures taking a tumble. we'll see fog in the north and east bay valleys. this is from the emeryville camera. temperatures this morning, chilly with the rain. tomorrow morning and monday morning, we could see some frost, and we're not done, with the possibility of high elevation snow. here's a look at live doppler 7hd. we do have some rain from southern california and also the snow in the mountains. so, this is the same system that dropped parallel to the coast yesterday, and brought most of the reason to the south bay and the higher elevations. right now, i
covers 129 households in date city in kawauchi village. not all households may decide to return. radiation levels remain above the international level of 1 millisievert per year for ordinary citizens. government officials say they hope to lift the remaining hot spot advisories for 153 households in minami soma city. they are among 104 municipalities in eight prefectures where radiation levels stood at 0.23 microsieverts per hour or higher. administrative officials said radiation levels in the three areas are below that benchmark. a team of foreign experts held its first meeting with representatives of japan's nuclear regulation authority. u.s. and european scientists offered advice on nuclear safety. richard meserve is former chairman of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. he says people overseeing the nuclear industry must have technical skills if they are to properly enforce regulations and that those skills must be continuously assessed. he also said foreign staff should be hired if necessary. andre-claude lacoste is the former head of france's nuclear authority. he say p
international center. friday december 14 city club will host dan cronin, president of the io of the national association and homelessness. these visit our website, city club.org for information about her upcoming foreign or to listen to a podcast of past programs. we'd like to welcome our guests at tables hosted by humana. and medical mutual. thank you for your support. would also like to welcome to today's program students who are joining us from the area high schools. student participation is made possible by generous gift from a charitable trust her today we welcome students from jcpenney school. students, please stand and be reckoned as. [applause] now we would like to return to her speaker for a traditional city club question and answer. we welcome questions for my phone, putting guests. holding the microphone today is kerry miller. we have our first question please. >> mr. brousard commie talk about complexities facing the average american patient. certainly insurance exchanges in the next year or so will make it more complex. [inaudible] in the drafting of the affordable care act. why
of over and hour, 160-minute delays averaging in the city of philadelphia, and philly international airport. the rain moving on in. in new york city not expecting to see too much snowfall, maybe a coating, an inch or two into the afternoon hours and the evening. inland, the taoeupb yore portions of the northeast easily over a foot of snow. some place expect thing 18 inches. severe weather risk across parts of the indianas and the char line as. >> reporter: i just made it through laguardia last notice and that weather forecast is exactly why i came back. thank you. >> reporter: the united states is less than a week away from going over the so-called fiscal cliff. they say if president obama and congress don't make a deal we will almost certainly see a recession. do you buy that, steven? >> the congressional budget office is a nonpartisan group that does this and says we will in fact have an immediate rescission. they say that we come out of a short, sharp recession stronger than we would be if we didn't go into that recession in the first place. we stop borrowing money from the futur
rebel operations in the eastern city of aszohr. meanwhile, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in moscow and they are calling for a syrian-led political transition. they warn the conflict is becoming more militarized and sectarian. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> the meeting appears to signal a shift in position by russia. so far moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust syrian president who has been a longtime ally. >>> meanwhile, a member of russia's parliament is trying to reverse part of a controversial law banning all adoptions by americans. the state-run news agency says the lawmaker is submitting an amendment that would allow americans to adopt children with disabilities. but the u.s. is hoping for a total reversal and so are hundreds of americans waiting to adopt russian orphans. lisa silvester has more. >> report
the warplanes. what we hear again and again when rebels capture a city or liberate a city and then the airplanes come in and warplanes start shelling and drive them out of those areas. >> we know the international envoy for syria he was in russia and today he's in egypt. what specifically is he trying to accomplish? >> well, he's in egypt today to report back to the arab league and to the secretary-general of the arab league and his findings from his diplomatic trips these past few days. he was in syria meeting with other figures and then brahimi went to moscow where he met with the foreign minister. the foreign minister of russia as well as brahimi urged all sides to come to the table but the fighting still rages on in syria. now, today, we heard just in the last hour from brahimi. he actually said in cairo that the situation is so bad in syria that now we have close to 50,000 people killed there in the nearly two years of war. by next year, up to 100,000. there is an opportunity of parties to come together, but not going to last forever and the situation there is getting more and more dire eve
are claiming they attacked several rebel operations in the eastern city. meantime, russia's top diplomat and international envoy to syria met in mosquito. they're calling for a -- in moscow. they're calling for a syrian-elderly transition and warning the conflict is becoming more medicilitarized and sectar. >> the conflict is not only more and more militarized, it is also more and more sectarian. and if we are not careful, if the syrians themselves are not careful, it will be a mainly sectarian conflict with really dire consequences for the people of syria. >> moscow has opposed efforts by the u.n. security council to oust the syrian president, a long-time ally. >>> one of the effects as the fiscal cliff gets closer. the hardline tea party is having a harder time holding the line on an absolute pledge not to raise taxes. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchod
of a glorious past. and some parts of the city bustle with holiday energy. but not far away: closed-up storefronts. and, further below the surface, this: a health clinic set up by the greek branch of the international aid group, doctors of the world to serve the country's newly poor. dr. nikitis kanakis is its director. >> brown: kanakis group, in fact, had to cut back some of its work in africa because of the needs at home. here in perama, unemployment tops 50% as the shrinking economy has crippled much of the local shipping industry. at the same time, the deeply indebted greek government has made dramatic budget cuts, including to health benefits. the combination has left many here without access to private or public care. and that's meant a stunning rise in disease and mortality rates. >> brown: economists, of course, speak of a different kind of necessary medicine: the kind a deeply indebted nation must take. the price for living and consuming well beyond its means for far too long. >> the medicine is necessary. it was, though, delivered very abruptly. >> brown: as a government
be the last warning washington gets. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is inside syria right now where the fighting rages on. >> reporter: aleppo's old city has not seen such devastation since occupied by the mongol invaders eight centuries ago. this mosque for example dates back to 1315. this is syria's rich cultural heritage. and now everywhere we look it's been scarred by war. once bustling winding streets now a maze of ever-shifting front lines. overhead, the thundering of fighter jets. a small han lodging for caravans lies in ruins. for more than three millennia aleppo has been a cross roads for traders. we hurried through the courtyard of a traditional home. sheets are strung across streets to block snipers' line of sight. those who dare venture quickly across. a unit of fighters records people's names and license plates. only those who have shops here are allowed through. abu bashir says they're trying to clamp down on robberies. he shows us the list. the highlighted names have cleared out all their possessions. in one market a shop recently hit by army fire still smol
of financial support they got from the opposition or international community. would that make the situation more difficult? despite that, all of these liberated areas, they became very excited. they start thinking about some civilian projects. in one city, as example, six elementary and secondary schools are out of service. no one is interested to send his kids to the school. when i left the city -- next week, a fighter jet hits one of the schools. this is why none of the people are interested to send their kids to the school. they are still easy targets. even the hospitals are being targeted by the regime. we cannot call these as mainly liberated areas, because they are still targeted by the air force of the assad regime. that reflects the difficulties between the different groups of the three syrian army. we have borders with iraq and turkey under the control of the free syrian army. because of the absence of having a central command of the free syrian army, each border is controlled by a different group. there is a lack of authority which can extend its power. there is high risk for any
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)